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The lower Omo is home to a remarkable mix of small, Contrasting ethnic groups including Karo, Dassanach, Bodi, Mursi, Surma, Arbore, Hamer

Just to express their artistic impulses. Both the Surma and the Karo for example, are experts at body painting, using clays and locally available vegetable pigments to trace fantastic patterns on each other’s faces, chests, arms, and legs . These designs have no special symbolic significance but are created purely for fun and aesthetic effect, each artist vying to outdo his fellows.

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The Mursi or Murzu are ethnic groups located in the Southern Ethiopia, inside Mago national park. They are nomadic cattle herder.

The Mursi are surrounded by mountains between the Omo River and its tributary the Mago. This is one of the most isolated regions of the country. Their neighbors include the Ari, the Banna, the Bodi, the Kara, the Kwegu, the Me’en the Nyangatom and the Suri. They are grouped together with the Me'en and Suri by the Ethiopian government under the name Surma.

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Surma, also known as the Suri people live in the southwestern plains of Ethiopia. They raise cattle and farm when the land is fertile. Cattle are important to the Suri, giving them status. The more cattle a tribesmen has, the wealthier they are. In order for a man to marry a women in the Suri tribe, he must own at least 60 cattle.

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The ethnic diversity you get in the southern part of Ethiopia is great. The Hamer, with their attribute high cheekbones, elaborate costumes of beads, cowries and leather, and thick copper necklaces, are among the most readily identifiable of the South Omo peoples in Ethiopia.

They are known in Evangadi dance (night dancing) and Bull Jumping activities, hair & Wearing style. They are friendly and warm people.

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Banna, Bana, and Benna are other spellings for the Bena people. They are neighbors with the Hamer tribe and it is believed that the Bena actually originated from them centuries ago. The market in Key Afer is often visited by them.

Just like most of the indigenous tribes in the lower Omo Valley, the Bena practice ritual dancing and singing. The men often have their hair dressed up with a colorful clay cap that is decorated with feathers. Both the men and women wear long garments and paint their bodies with white chalk. Women of the tribe wear beads in their hair that is held together with butter.

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The Karo or Kara is a small tribe with an estimated population between 1,000 and 3,500. They are closely related to the Kwegu tribe. They live along the east banks of the Omo River in southern Ethiopia and practice flood retreat cultivation. The crops that are grown by them are sorghum and maize. Only small cattle are kept because of the tsetse flies. These flies are large and consume the blood of vertebrate animals.

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Tsamai, are found in the semi-arid region of the Woyto Valley. These people are agro-pastoralist and use both livestock herding and agriculture to survive. Common crops grown by the tribe are sorghum, millet and sometimes cotton.

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The Ari people inhabit the northern part of the Mago National Park in Ethiopia and have the largest territory of all the tribes in the area. They have fertile lands allowing them to have several types of plantations.

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The Bodi or Me'en people live close to the Omo River in southern Ethiopia. Men of the Bodi are typically overweight because they consume large amounts of honey. The men wear a strip of cotton around their waist or walk around naked. In June, the Bodi celebrate Ka'el.

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The Daasanach are an ethnic group of Ethiopia, Kenya and Sudan. Their main homeland is in the South Omo zone of the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People's Region of Ethiopia, around the North end of Lake Turkana. The Daasanach are traditionally a pastoral people by tradition, but in recent years have become primarily agro-pastoral.

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The Nyangatom (sometimes written Inyangatom, also known as Donyiro or Bumé) are a numerically small and warlike pastoral ethnic group of south western Ethiopia and south eastern South Sudan, who live with their herds in a particularly inhospitable part of the disputed Ilemi Triangle.

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The Arbore tribe is a small tribe that lives in the southwest region of the Omo Valley. They have ancestral and cultural links to the Konso people and perform many ritual dances while singing. The Tsemay people are their neighboring tribe.

Arbores are pastoralists (livestock farmers). They believe that their singing and dancing eliminates negative energy and with the negative energy gone, the tribe will prosper.

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The Nuer are pastoral people who rely on cattle products for almost every aspect of their daily lives. These people are a confederation of tribes located in South Sudan and western Ethiopia. Collectively, the Nuer form one of the largest ethnic groups in East Africa. They Border such tribes as the Dinka, Anyuak, Shilluk and other minor tribes in both Ethiopia and Sudan.

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The Anuak are a river people whose villages are scattered along the banks and rivers of southeastern, South Sudan and western Ethiopia, in the Gambela Region. Most of them live in the southwestern area of Ethiopia.

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The konso people live in the south Central Part of Ethiopia. The Konso are a Cushitic people. Their sharply delimited traditional territory is bounded by lands of Oromo peoples, to whom the Konso are culturally and linguistically related. Konso people are Cushitic people. They live in large towns, each governed by a council of elders.

They have a clan-based societal arrangement. The people are comprised of nine clans (gada). The clans’ structure is based on exogamy and patrilinearity.

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Well known cotton weavers, the Dorze people were once warriors. They are famous for their cotton woven cloths and beehive huts. The Dorze people also live in large communities north of Addis Ababa. They cultivate their own food and prevent erosion by terracing along the mountainside. In their farmlands, the Dorze will grow highland cereals. They also grow spices, vegetables, fruits and tobacco within their compound.

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